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Home » Forums » Forum Archives » Networking and Internet Sharing » Topic # 1262

rj45 cable?
uwantmore Oct-03-01 03:41 AM
well i bought all the goodies to make my own cables!!!! 2 75 ft cables ,i make the cables i use the straight threw method,both ends are the same .i crimp them all looks good , i plug it from my cable modem to my pc works great n/p,but i try to go from my router 2 my pc no luck doesn't work on my router both lights are lite,my router doesn't require a special cable it works great w/ my 3ft store bought rj45 cables everything is ok till i try and use these cables threw my router!!!!!!my model number of my router is a d-link DI-704 hope anyone can help maybe i need to switch something with the cables i'll try anything . i bought this blue cat 5 cable at lowes superstore !!!!!

6. RE: rj45 cable?
lbyard Oct-03-01 05:00 AM
In response to message 0
The 75-foot cable works great from your PC to your MODEM, but doesnít work from your PC to your router. How do know it isnít working? Because you canít connect to the Internet? Connect the 75-foot cable between the router and the PC. Set Start, Settings, Control Panel, Network, select the TCP/IP bound to the network adapter going to the router, Properties, IP Address, to Obtain IP address automatically and reboot. Run, Start, enter winipcfg, select the correct adapter and click Release, wait for it to go blank, and then click Renew. If it changes to something that starts with 192, the cable is working; the address came from the router. If that works, connect the MODEM to the router, go into the router with your browser per the user manual, and try to renew its IP address from the MODEM. If that doesn't fix it, idowantmore... details, such as MODEM make/model, ISP info, etc. Larry

11. RE: rj45 cable?
lbyard Oct-03-01 03:11 PM
In response to message 6
After sleeping on this one, I realized I overlooked the fact that the cable MODEM runs at 10 MHz and the other side of the router switch runs at 100 MHz. Coincidently, I just responded to another post regarding long cables and transmission speed. So, with a simple Ctrl V, I repeat the post here:

A marginal cable, especially a long one, will sometimes work at a lower frequency and not work at 100 MHz. The DI-704 Home DSL/Cable Gateway is a combination router and 4-port Ethernet switch (http://duxcw.com/faq/network/hubsw.htm). It should operate full duplex with a network adapter capable of full duplex operation. Assuming there is no flaw in the auto-negotiation process or the ports, half duplex operation could indicate a marginal cable. During the negotiation between the network adapter and the DI-704, a condition where packet collisions can occur is detected. This condition is most likely derived from corrupted packets or excessive noise (http://duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable4.htm) on the line. The result is that when transmitting the receiver at the port where the transmitter is located is set to listen for packet collisions instead receiving data simultaneously from the transmitter at the other end of the line.

I would not be satisfied with this condition because of the increased probability that there will be network problems (drop-outs, etc.) and data corruption, and the performance certainly will be marginal. The correct course of action is to verify that the cable is made from CAT 5 or 5e cable and plugs, that the cable has solid core wire (for cables longer than 3 Meters or about 10 feet; I have seen longer cables with stranded wireó25 feet--work OK), the plugs are designed for solid core wire, the cable is run correctly (http://duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable9.htm), and the plugs are wired and crimped properly (http://duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable7.htm and http://duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable8.htm). If all of these conditions are meant and the cable and plugs have been carefully inspected, flip a coin, cut the plug off one end of the cable, replace it, inspect it, and test the cable again. RJ-45 plugs are cheap; an unreliable network can be very expensive. Larry


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